SE520 - Visual Anthropology: Photographic Stream

Lent Term 2002

Course Convenor: Glenn Bowman office: Eliot Extension L 16
e-mail: glb@ukc.ac.uk tel. extn. 3180
Office hours: Monday 13:30-14:30 & Friday 14:00-15:00

Lectures: Keynes Large Seminar Room Fridays 3.00-4.00 pm

Seminars: Keynes Large Seminar Room Fridays 4.00-5.00 pm

Darkroom Instructor: Ken Giles (e-mail <k.w.giles@btinternet>)

Darkroom Work: Weeks 15, 16 and 17 in groups of four; times and dates by arrangements

Location of Darkrooms: CIS Rooms (basement Rutherford)


Assessment: Over the year students will be assessed by coursework (2 essays: one Michelmas, one Lent), by a two-hour (2 question) examination, and by a visual project with supporting dissertation. Essays and coursework carry 20% of the total mark, the examination 40%, and the visual project 40%.

Lent Essay Requirements: During the Lent term the essay will take the form of a critical diary chronicling your encounter not only with the practical exercises structured into the course but also with theoretical and practical issues pertaining to the research for and production of your visual project. I here expect to see materials collected (photographs and other forms of data) during field projects along with reflections on the process of collecting and evaluating them and commentary on the collective assessment meetings held in class time. I also anticipate a record of readings made and of the insights they provide into what you are doing as well as a recounting of research specific to your project, of field trips made, of tasks there carried out and of problems encountered. You are expected to show in this diary evidence of careful and critical reading from recommended course readings as well as from those books and articles listed in the syllabus after each week's topic. The diary can include photographs you've taken, articles you've cut out of newspapers or magazines, and the like. The diary work will provide some of the raw materials with which your supporting dissertation will be made.

Essay Deadlines: Diaries must be handed in to the Departmental Office, L46 Eliot Extension and a receipt obtained by 12 noon of Thursday 28 March. Note: if any diary is late it will not be marked unless medical or other evidence is provided.

Photographic Project: Students will submit a photographic essay either in print form or mounted in a multimedia format. Combinations of media are very welcome (i.e., photographic work with video or audio recordings of interviews with subjects discussing the photos, video and photographic work mounted in multimedia exhibition). Each student must additionally provide a supporting 2,500 word dissertation to accompany the project, relating this to conceptual issues treated in the course. Projects and accompanying dissertation must be submitted no later than 12 noon of Thursday 28 March. Note: if any project is late it will not be marked unless medical or other evidence is provided.

Students should be aware that they will be introduced to basic techniques of production and presentation. The small practical component of the course cannot attempt to provide qualified instruction in professional photographic expertise, and we are narrowly constrained by the limited equipment and technical support available. The visual project is rather intended to give practical experience of general techniques of visual communication that should critically inform your understanding of more theoretical topics dealt with in the course. Our objective is to learn about issues of visual representation in anthropology rather than to become professional photographers!

Course Aims and Objectives:

Recommended Course Texts:

Banks, Marcus. 2001. Visual Methods in Social Research. London: Sage.

Banks, Marcus & Howard Morphy (eds). 1997. Rethinking Visual Anthropology. New Haven: Yale

Berger, John & Jean Mohr. 1982. Another Way of Telling, Harmondsworth: Penguin

Burgin, Victor (ed). 1982. Thinking photography. London: Macmillan

Collier, John & Malcolm Collier. 1986. Visual Anthropology: Photography as a Research Method. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press or, alternatively, the earlier edition which excludes video: Collier, John. 1967. Visual Anthropology: Photography as a Research Method (Studies in Anthropological Method). New York: Holt, Reinhart and Winston.

Edwards, Elizabeth (ed.) 1992. Anthropology and Photography, 1860-1920. New Haven and London: Yale.

Evans, Jessica (ed.) 1997. The Camerawork Essays: Context and Meaning in Photography. London: Rivers Oram Press.

Harper, Douglas (ed.) 1994. Cape Breton 1952: The Photographic Vision of Timothy Asch. Los Angeles: International Visual Sociology Association.

Hockings, Paul (ed.) 1995. Principles of Visual Anthropology. New York: Mouton de Gruyter.

Horenstein, Henry. 1983. Black and White Photography: A Basic Manual. Boston: Little, Brown & Co.

Pink, Sarah. 2001. Doing Visual Ethnography: Images, Media and Representation in Research. London: Sage

Schaefer, John. 1992. Basic Techniques in Photography: An Ansel Adams Guide. Boston: Little, Brown & Co.

Sekula, Allan. 1996. Fish Story. Dusseldorf: Richter Verlag.

Solomon-Godeau, Abigail. 1991. Photography at the Dock: Essays on Photographic History, Institutions and Practices (Media and Society). Minneapolis: University of Minnesotta Press.

Trachtenberg, Alan (ed.) 1980. Classic Essays on Photography. New Haven: Leete's Island Books.

Journals: Visual Anthropology and Visual Anthropology Review (both in Templeman Library).


Programme


Week 13 (11 January):
Division of students into photographic and video streams. Outlining of course aims and objectives. Discussion of student projects in train.

Recommended Reading:

Horenstein, Henry. 1983. Black and White Photography: A Basic Manual. Boston: Little, Brown and Co. pp. 3-67

Wilbert Reuben Norman, Jr., 1991. "Photography as a Research Tool" in Visual Anthropology, vol. 4, pp. 193-216
or
Fadwa al-Guindi,
'From Pictorializing to Visual Anthropology' in Bernard, H. Russell (ed.) 1998. Handbook of Methods in Cultural Anthropology. Walnut Creek, Cal.: AltaMira Press. pp. 459-511


Week 14 (18 January): Camera techniques. Field Surveys, Inventories, Visual Records of Technologies

Recommended Reading:

Collier, John & Malcolm Collier. 1986. Visual Anthropology: Photography as a Research Method. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press. ch. 4-6.

During this session film stock will be distributed and Ken Giles will be offering basic instruction on film loading and unloading as well as techniques of exposure. It is imperative that you have a camera signed out and with you at this time.

Project: Carrying out a visual survey


Week 15 (23 January) Wednesday Session: Developing Negatives (in CIS Darkroom)

2 hour sessions in groups of six.


Week 16 (30 January) Wednesday Session: Basic Printing - proofsheets (in CIS Darkroom)

2 hour sessions in groups of four.


Week 16 (1 February): Photographing Social Relations

Recommended Reading:

Collier, John & Malcolm Collier. 1986. Visual Anthropology: Photography as a Research Method. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press. ch. 7

Harper, Douglas (ed.) 1994. Cape Breton 1952: The Photographic Vision of Timothy Asch. Los Angeles: International Visual Sociology Association.

Project: photographing an event or situation


Week 17 (6 February) Wednesday Session: Advanced Printing (in CIS darkroom)

2 hour sessions in groups of four.

Week 18 (13 February 4pm-6pm): Adobe Photoshop (in L49) - Alan Bicker

Week 18 (15 February):
Interviewing techniques, including tape recorders

Recommended Reading:

Collier, John & Malcolm Collier. 1986. Visual Anthropology: Photography as a Research Method. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press. chapters 8-10 & 14

Levy, Robert and Douglas Hollan, 1998.APerson Centered Interviewing and Observation@ in Bernard, H. Russell (ed.) Handbook of Methods in Cultural Anthropology. Walnut Creek, Cal.: AltaMira Press. pp. 333-364
or
Miller, Jody and Barry Glassner, "The 'Inside' and the 'Outside': Finding Realities in Interviews" in Qualitative Research: Theory Method and Practice ed. David Silverman. London: Sage Publications. pp. 99-112. orPelto, Pertti J. and Gretel H. Pelto. Anthropological Research: The Structure of Inquiry. London: Cambridge University Press. pp. 67-122.

Project: carrying out a photographic interview

Week 19 (20 February 4pm-6pm): Mounting Photographs on the Web (in L49) - David Zeitlyn

Week 20 (1 March): The Archive Issue: Research, Categorization, Digitalisation, Storage, and Access

Recommended Reading:

Collier, John & Malcolm Collier. 1986. Visual Anthropology: Photography as a Research Method. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press. chapter 16 and final section of 19.

Brettell, Caroline. 1998. 'Fieldwork in the Archives: Methods and Sources in Historical Anthropology' in Bernard, H. Russell (ed.) 1998. Handbook of Methods in Cultural Anthropology. Walnut Creek, Cal.: AltaMira Press. pp. 513-546

Malmsheimer, Lonna M. 1987. "Photographic Analysis as Ethnohistory: Interpretative Strategies" in Visual Anthropology, vol. 1, pp. 21-36

Project: organising and classifying your photographs


Week 22 (15 March): Analysis, Organisation and Presentation: Presenting an Argument

Recommended Reading:

Collier, John & Malcolm Collier. 1986. Visual Anthropology: Photography as a Research Method. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press. 15, 17 & 18

Sekula, Allan. 1996. Fish Story. Dusseldorf: Richter Verlag

Week 24: Submission of Project by 12 noon of Thursday 28 March